Stem cells combined with traditional care reduce heart failure

The heart is one of the most important organs in our organism that keeps us alive. There’s plenty of literature related to the heart, it has been used in a poetic way, sentimental, as an engine with complexity. But here we are going to talk about it as an organ.

We know the heart consists of four cavities that helps to pump the oxygenated blood and taking away the deoxygenated blood,

Stem cell therapy is helping professional athletes

Orthopedic specialists in the United States have recently been offering autologous treatments as a way of healing the injuries suffered by athletes.

The goal of these treatments is to speed up recovery time by introducing the athlete’s own stem cells into areas of the body suffering from damage and chronic inflammation. These doctors are reporting success with injured football players,

What’s it like to have your bone marrow harvested?

People can be squeamish about things they’ve never experienced before, especially when it comes to medical procedures, so we’re not surprised when a prospective patient asks us about bone marrow.

The fact of the matter is that the primitive bone marrow transplantation practiced on leukemia patients a half-century ago was slow and painful.

Is your current treatment working for you?

The biggest problem with incurable conditions is that they’re incurable. Standard treatments for such cases usually obligate the patients to spend the rest of their lives taking drugs that don’t make them better and often produce unpleasant side-effects.
Conventional wisdom has a saying about this sort of thing. “If you keep doing what you’ve been doing,

Stem cell treatment for Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that often impairs speech and other motor functions. Its symptoms include muscle rigidity, tremors, and the slowing of physical movement to a total loss of physical movement in the worst cases. Secondary symptoms may include autonomic, cognitive, and linguistic impairment. Parkinson’s disease is chronic,

Retinitis pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa is the name given to a group of genetic, usually hereditary, disorders of the retina. (The retina is the part of the eye that converts light to nerve impulses.) About one in 3500 people suffer from retinitis pigmentosa throughout the world. It is a progressive disease ending in tunnel vision or complete blindness and for which there is no known cure.

Diabetic retinopathy

One of the usual complications of diabetes is the breakdown of the blood vessels that feed the retina, which is the part of the eye that processes images. Retinopathy occurs when blood leaks out of those vessels into the eye, causing blurred vision and ultimately blindness. Eighty percent of all patients who have suffered from diabetes for ten years develop diabetic retinopathy as a consequence.

12

START TYPING AND PRESS ENTER TO SEARCH